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Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ:AMZN) , which happens to be a top end Seattle-based provider was recently given a patent that would as a matter of fact see it come up with “Aquatic Storage Facilities” for its packages.

According to sources, the company looks forward to outline a wide range of issues with land warehouses, such as the actual distance the robots or the staff members rather will need to walk within the warehouse itself in a bid to try and fulfill the various customer requests. The other thing will be on what way to utilize space appropriately and efficiently.

A group of some top executives working with the company have moved ahead to make a revelation that that aquatic storage facility that was proposed by Amazon could be the most awaited solution for those particular problems considering that it can be sued in natural bodies of water, such as Lake Union in Seattle, not forgetting that it utilizes a combination of natural flows and automation to move and store objects.

On a good day, this is exactly how the system would operate. It has to begin with the dropping of packages from the air or otherwise they way be placed into a liquid container facility. A natural water body would as a matter of fact do just fine.

The packages eventually get to float to a desired depth and of course, that has much to do with manipulations by the computer device. Take for instance a scenario where the device may go ahead and charge a package with additional air or water volume to facilitate its sinking into the prescribed depth.

In certain cases, the package simply aligns to the natural flow of water and moves with it to the storage spot. Finally it comes to the point of shipping the package. It is at this time when the transducer emits a sound which eventually triggers a parachute kept in a cartridge attached to the package. From there, the parachute propels the package upwards to reach the surface.

An Amazon employee, a drone or an aircraft picks up the package. It goes without saying that these are quite simplified operations.

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